25 Glamorous Gray Kitchens

 25 Glamorous Gray Kitchens

I used to think that gray only worked well in modern design or in seaside-themed rooms.  Wrong!  Gray continues its reign as the hottest neutral color right now and exudes a sense of sophistication and glamor.  There are so many different styles of gray to choose from, such as Pewter, Charcoal, Greige (a cross between Gray and Beige) and Blue Gray, that the color can work in any style of kitchen from traditional, to modern to eclectic.  And think beyond just walls!  In the images below you’ll see that the color introduced not just on the walls, but the backsplash, the cabinets and even the glaze.

 

 

 

 

Here’s a look at 25 glamorous gray kitchens!

 

by Home & Stone

 Gray cabinets and countertop contrasted with a dark wood island

by Andrew Roby General Contractors

 Light gray cabinets mixed with warm wood tones and copper

by Pickell Architecture

 Gray countertops and gray accents in the window seats

by Jason Ball Interiors

 Dark gray cabinetry and gray accents used in the backsplash design

by Chelsea Atelier Architect, PC

 

by Orren Pickell Building Group

 Gray walls pick up the veining in the marble countertop

 

by Avenue B Development

 Gray glass front cabinets with back wall of cabinet painted to match

by Gina Spiller Design

 Gray island countertop and gray glaze added to the cabinets

by Marth O’Hara Interiors

 Dark gray cabinets contrasted with white countertops and center island

by kim scodro interiors

 

by Trinity Construction Services

 High contrast gray-blue center island that is also picked up in the cushions

 

by CliqStudios Cabinets

 

by Alan Mascord Design Associates

 Dark gray walls and backsplash provide high contrast with the light wood tones

by Architectural Design Consultants

 Shades of gray throughout with pops of yellow to add warmth

by Great Spaces!

 Gray subway tiles with gray grout and cabinetry accented with black glaze

by Amy

 Rustic design using gray cabinets

by Garrison Hullinger Interior Design Inc.

 Warm-toned kitchen using gray hood and backsplash design

by Arch Studio Inc.

 

by Marcel Page Photography

 Gray backsplash to tie together the white cabinets and black countertops

by Harry Braswell Inc.

 Gray-blue mosaic tiles with gray vinyl on the banquette

by Studio B Architecture + Interiors

 

by Sally Wheat Interiors

 Gray cabinets accented by bright, primary colors

by Marcel Page Photography

 Soft gray walls to complement the cabinets

by Carter Inc. Builders

 

by Silvan Homes

 

 

Quick Tip – The keep gray from looking too dreary in a kitchen, try pairing it with warmer material, such as wood, or a warmer pop of color like red or yellow!

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My Vintage Finds – A Day at the Antique Faire!

Last Sunday, my husband and I set off in the early hours of the morning to scour the antiques at the Alameda Point Antique Faire.  We were there before the sun was up, standing in line with other collectors and bargain hunters, waiting to see what the day would have in store for us.  With coffee in hand, we dashed through the gates as soon as the event opened, using the flashlight app on our cell phones to light our way (mental note, next time bring actual flashlights!).

I ended up buying four vintage items that I absolutely love and have been busy finding places for them in my home.  As you might recall from my previous post on Vintage Finds, I have been looking for wooden shoe forms and a vintage dress forms for some time.  Thankfully, I found them both at the faire!

 

Shoe Form and Vintage Book

 My wooden shoe form now completes the display on my console and sits near my grandfather’s book of musical terms from 1914.

Vintage Shoe Forms

 

 

 

Vintage Dress FormThe dress form is now in my room, waiting for the finishing touches on our master bedroom remodel.

 

I’m still working to incorporate the other two items into my home but will post pics when ready!  And a big “thank you” to my husband for getting up at 4am with me and carrying my purchases around for hours.  Can’t wait to do it again next month!

 

Ribbon Rosette Lampshade – Easy DIY

Ribbon Rosette Lampshade

Ribbon Rosette Lampshade 1We are in the process of remodeling our master bedroom and I had been looking for new bedside lamps for some time when I came across this one at Marshalls.  The size was right, the price was right (only $30) and I loved the linen lamp shade but overall, it seemed a little….well….blah.  The neutral color works well with our room but I felt like it needed a little warmth and a bit more elegance on the shade, so I decided to add a ribbon rosette.

 

 

 

 

 

Supplies:

  • 1 1/2″ Wired burlap ribbon (length depends on the diameter of your lampshade)
  • 1 1/2″ nylon ribbon (length depends on your desired diameter of your rosette.  I used about 67″ to create a 3 1/2″ diameter rosette)
  • Skeleton key (any small metal object could work.  The jewelry making supply section at the craft sore is a great place to look for objects like this)
  • Scissors
  • Straight Pins
  • 1 self-adhesive pearl

 

Step 1Ribbon Rosette Lampshade 2

First, I started by knotting a length of 1 1/2″ wired burlap ribbon around the shade to add some warmth to the lighter-colored shade and to help color balance the base and the top.  I chose wired ribbon because it’s a bit easier to hold in place when tied around the shade.

 

Step 2Ribbon Rosette Lampshade 3

Next, I tucked a skeleton key behind the knot.  Now I probably would have done this no matter what because I like to add dimension and to include “hidden” objects in things, but in this case, the inclusion of the key has a practical purpose.  This key locks our nightstands and my kids are fascinated by it and are constantly walking off with it.  Now, it is safely tucked away in my lampshade so I always know where to find it!  The jewelry making section of the craft store is a great place to look if you don’t have a skeleton key but want to add a small, metal object.

 

Step 3Ribbon Rosette Lampshade - Easy DIY

Lastly, I created a rosette using a 67″ length of 1 1/2″ sheer nylon ribbon in off-white.  Here are the steps to create the rosette:

 

How to Make a Ribbon Rosette

1.  Tie a loose knot in the end of the ribbonRibbon Rosette Step 1

 

2.  Tuck the end of the ribbon down into the knot so that it is hiddenRibbon Rosette Step 2

 

3.  Wrap the long end of the ribbon up and over the knot to conceal itRibbon Rosette Step 3

 

4. Start turning the ribbon around the knot, slightly twisting it as you go along.  Make sure to only turn in one direction to build up “petals”Ribbon Rosette Step 4

5. Twist the ribbon as you turn it to add dimension.  I chose to twist in an uneven manner so that my rosette would look more natural.Ribbon Rosette Step 5

 

6.  To create an open, airy rosette like I used, wrap the ribbon loosely.  It can be touch to hold it together so you’ll need to use your thumb to hold the center and your fingers to hold the back. (Please excuse my broken thumbnail!  I did that last weekend playing with the kids.  Ouch!)Ribbon Rosette Step 6

 

7.  As you build up more layers, you’ll want to secure it as you move along to make it easier on yourself.  I didn’t want my rosettes to be permanent (because I might use the ribbon for something else later on) and so used straight pins to secure the petals to the knot as I went along.  The nice thing about using pins is that you can shape easily shape your flower when done to get just the look you want, but for a more lasting hold, you could use a hot glue gun..Ribbon Rosette Step 7

 

8.  Keep turning and twisting the ribbon around until you reach your desired diameter.  I like to make the last couple of turns very loose so that the outer edges of the rosette are uneven.Ribbon Rosette Step 8

9.  When finished, secure the end (with either a straight pin or hot glue) and add a self-stick pearl to the center to give it a finished look.Adhesive Pearls

 Finished Ribbon Rosette

 

 

The ribbon I chose has a bit of shimmer to it, which contrasts with the harsh texture of the burlap and gives me look I was hoping for.  In this case, I used a straight pin to secure the rosette to the burlap but hot glue would be a better choice if you wanted a sturdier hold.

I’m really happy with how it turned out and feel that the lamp is now a better fit with the overall feel of our room!

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